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Thread: Post Storm Rehabilitation

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    VIMC Senior Cupid   BLUE_APYAR is on a distinguished road BLUE_APYAR's Avatar
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    Default Post Storm Rehabilitation

    After the storm.. We felt sad , anger , despair and depression. I look for something we can do after storm rehabilitation..I did googling and found some article about post storm care.. I hope it will help little bit..We need this thread for that kind of discussion..
    ___________________________________________
    After the Storm Has Passed

    The storm has gone through and its time to assess the damage. Hopefully you have stored enough batteries to keep your radio running if power is out because youll want to hear news reports about damage, road closures, power outages and all other emergency instructions. Expect between three to seven days of uncertainty, depending on the storm, so youll need to rely upon what youve stored for food, water, medications and entertainment.

    The stronger the storm, the more severe the damage. If a Country is hit with a category 3, 4 or 5 hurricane, it could be weeks or months before life gets back to normal. Consider these realities in your planning! Also heed the following common-sense safety steps during the recovery.
    • Wait for authorities to give word before going outside or returning home. The clear skies and calm winds of the hurricane eye can be deceiving.
    • At first, stay off the roads. Emergency vehicles have priority.
    • When safe to return home, avoid flooded areas, downed power lines and debris.
    • Have valid I.D. with your correct address for security checkpoints.
    • Be patient. It may take up to three days for emergency workers to reach your neighborhood; up to a month for utilities to be restored.
    • Dont let children play in flood waters or near storm drains.
    • Clean up the most dangerous conditions in your home, such as broken glass. Take photos for insurance purposes.
    • Use 9-1-1 for life-threatening emergencies only not damages or power outages.
    • Watch for downed or dangling utility wires, especially when cutting or clearing debris or walking through standing water.
    • Dont try to help a stranded animal.
    • Use caution when opening doors, cabinets and closets. Items may have moved around during the storm and could fall and cause injury.
    • Sterilize tap water for drinking or cooking with purification tablets.
    • Use foods from the refrigerator and the freezer first, non-perishable foods last.
    Generator Safety
    Those who use a home generator will have limited power during a prolonged
    power outage. Use them to keep a refrigerator cold, run a fan, recharge
    your cell phone or operate a microwave oven. Portable generators can help
    make your storm recovery more comfortable, but they can also kill if not used
    correctly. Read instructions carefully and fully understand how to use your
    specific generator. Important tips on generator safety:


    Carbon Monoxide (CO): A colorless, odorless gas produced when the
    generator burns fuel. CO is deadly in very small concentrations.
    • Always use generators outdoors, away from doors, windows and vents.
    • NEVER use generators in homes, garages, basements, crawl spaces, or
      other enclosed or partially enclosed areas, even with ventilation.
    • Install battery-operated or plug in (with battery backup) CO alarms in your home.
    • Test CO alarms often and replace batteries when needed.
    Electrical Hazards
    Generators create electricity, which can kill if you receive a shock.
    • Keep the generator dry. Operate on a dry surface under an open, canopy-like structure.
    • Dry your hands before touching the generator.
    • Plug appliances directly into generator or use a heavy-duty outdoor rated
      extension cord. Make sure entire extension cord is free of cuts or
      tears and the plug has all three prongs, especially a grounding pin.
    • NEVER plug the generator into a wall outlet. This practice, known as
      backfeeding, can cause an electrocution risk to utility workers and others
      served by the same utility transformer.
    • If necessary to connect generator to house wiring to power appliances,
      have a qualified electrician install appropriate equipment and teach you
      how to use it.
    Fire Hazards
    Generators use flammable fuels to generate power, increasing the chance of an accidental fire that can threaten your life and property.
    • Before refueling the generator, turn it off and let it cool. Fuel spilled on hot
      engine parts could ignite.
    • Always store fuel outside of living areas in properly labeled containers.
    • Store fuel away from any fuel burning appliance.
    Chainsaw Safety
    While it is necessary to clear downed trees and branches, take great caution when using a chainsaw. Important safety tips to help keep you safe and injury-free:
    Before Starting the Chainsaw
    • Read your owners manual.
    • Wear proper safety gear, including eye and hearing protection, heavy
      work gloves and work boots.
    • Check controls, chain tension, and all bolts and handles to ensure they are
      functioning properly.
    • Fuel your cool saw at least 10 feet from sources of ignition.
    While Running the Chainsaw
    • Keep hands on the handles, and maintain secure footing while operating
      the chainsaw.
    • Clear the area of obstacles that might interfere with cutting, especially
      downed power lines.
    • Do not cut directly overhead or over reach with the saw.
    • Be prepared for kickback. DURING a storm

    Food Safety and Guidelines
    A hurricane can cut power to your home for days even weeks. While power outages can be annoying, they also present health concerns from food spoilage, especially when held above 40F. Tips to help keep you safe:
    • Before a storms arrival, take an inventory of the items in your refrigerator
      and freezer. Put this list on the refrigerator door. This way, you know where everything is located.
    • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible.
    • A full freezer with minimal door opening can keep frozen items
      safe for about two days.
    • Refrigerated foods should be safe as long as the power is out no more than about four to six hours. Discard any perishable food that has been above 40F for two hours or more and any food that has an unusual odor, color or texture.
    • If power will be off more than six hours, transfer refrigerated perishable foods to an insulated cooler filled with ice or frozen gel packs. Keep a thermometer in the cooler to be sure the food stays at 40 F or below.
    • Never taste food to determine its safety! Some foods may look and smell fine, but if theyve been at room temperature longer than two hours, the bacteria that causes foodborne illness can multiply very rapidly. For more information about food safety, call the Pinellas County Health Department at (727) 824-6900 www.pinellashealth.com
    Drinking Water
    A boil-water order can be issued during a heavy rain, a hurricane, a water main break or another significant event that affects the drinking water supply. What that means is that the possibility of some microbial contamination exists for tap water. How do you make your water safe to drink? While there are advanced and
    expensive filters and specialized water treatment tablets on the market that can accomplish this, there are two methods that are typically used by homeowners:


    Boiling
    Boiling is the most effective way to kill bacteria, viruses and parasites in water. According to the Florida State Health Department and the Center for Disease Control, bringing a pot of water to a full rolling boil for one minute is enough to kill pathogens and make the water safe to consume. A very important thing to remember is that the water must be brought to a full rolling boil before you start counting one minute. Let the water come to room temperature before drinking.


    Bleach
    Bleach is a less effective way to sanitize water, but can work if you dont have access to power or cooking fuel. Add 1/8 tsp. of common unscented household bleach (check the label, it should contain 5.25% sodium hypochlorite) per gallon of water and let the water stand for at least 30 minutes. Remember, these methods work with water that is clear but possibly contaminated. These methods wont work for sanitizing murky water taken from a ditch, for example.
    For more information, visit the Center for Disease Control food and water safety page at www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/foodwater.asp.


    Restroom Facilities
    Flooding and power outages can affect the sanitary sewer system. Improperly disposed human waste can lead to outbreaks of cholera, dysentery and other filth. Tips for a sewer outage
    • When instructed, do not use and flush your toilet. Powered sewer lift stations may be out of order, which could lead to a sewage back up into homes.
    • Use a chemical toilet if one is available.
    • Create an emergency toilet by using a five-gallon plastic bucket with a
      tight fitting lid, a heavy duty trash bag and household bleach.
    • You can also use your toilet bowl. Turn off water, flush one time to empty water and line with a heavy-duty trash bag. Add chlorine bleach to serve as a deodorant and disinfectant
    • DO NOT use kitty litter in your emergency toilet. This cannot be flushed
      after the sewage system is operational.
    • Once given the ok, dispose of the toilets contents into your household
      commode.
    • Thoroughly sanitize your emergency toilet with bleach before storing or disposing.
    • Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water or use a hand sanitizing gel
      after handling the emergency toilet.
    Driving Safe
    A hurricane can turn a familiar neighborhood into an unfamiliar place very quickly. Downed street signs, traffic lights and debris can make even a short drive dangerous. When you get behind the wheel, consider these tips:
    • DO NOT DRIVE THROUGH STANDING WATER. You will not know the depth of the water nor will you know the condition of the road under the water.
    • Match your speed to road conditions. Cars can quickly become uncontrollable
      when driving on damaged, debris-choked roads.
    • Visibility may be limited. Increased traffic on congested roadways and large trucks can obstruct your line of sight.
    • Maintain a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you.
    • Traffic patterns may be shifted in work zones; obey posted work zone speed limit at all times. Be aware of equipment and workers on or near the road.
    • Constantly scan for pedestrians who can quickly lose their footing.
    • Obey all road closed signs. Just because you cant see roadway damage doesnt mean it is safe to drive on.
    • Traffic signals may not work. Treat any intersection with nonworking traffic signals as an allway stop. Be prepared to stop at every intersection.
    • Not all road signs that were damaged or destroyed have been replaced; be prepared to yield to a pedestrian or another driver, or to stop unexpectedly.
    • Know where you are going and give yourself ample time to make your trip.
    • Drive with car lights on in rainy conditions, and slow down.
    Last edited by BLUE_APYAR; 05-07-2008 at 07:28 AM. Reason: fonts
    Dr. Blue :18:
    blue.apyar@gmail.com
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    Noble Contributor Wizard Cupid   Marzouki is on a distinguished road
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    VIMC Senior Cupid   BLUE_APYAR is on a distinguished road BLUE_APYAR's Avatar
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    Above article is not 100% fit with current condition in Myanamr.
    But We can copy and modify with our reality..

    Thats why I did not edit and post whole article. In US .. they have very good plan and department for natural disaster .. Even we are also oncall duty for disaster and prepare at least once a year for upcoming possibles disaster..

    Lets modify .. Do's and Don't s after storm in Burmese..please ..
    Dr. Blue :18:
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    Last edited by hotrod; 05-07-2008 at 08:56 PM.
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    Noble Contributor Cadet Cupid   byakga is on a distinguished road byakga's Avatar
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    Thanks Dr Blue for starting this thread. I would also like to share some resource from CDC, one of my fav references. Please visit the following link.

    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/



    Hurricanes
    Health & Safety


    Hurricane ReadinessHurricane RecoveryInfo for Specific GroupsOther Resources
    There are links leads to detailing. Eg. if you follow the link 'Key Facts About Recovery' you will reach to a page like this.




    ---->>>>>>

    Key Facts About Hurricane and Flood Recovery:

    Protect Your Health and Safety After a Hurricane or Flood

    Prevent illness from FOOD

    Identify and throw away food that may not be safe to eat. Throw away food that may have come in contact with flood or storm water. Throw away canned foods that are bulging, opened, or damaged. Throw away food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture. Throw away perishable foods (including meat, poultry, fish, eggs and leftovers) that have been above 40F for 2 hours or more. Thawed food that contains ice crystals or is 40F or below can be refrozen or cooked. If cans have come in contact with floodwater or storm water, remove the labels, wash the cans, and dip them in a solution of 1 cup of bleach in 5 gallons of water. Relabel the cans with a marker.
    Store food safely. While the power is out, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. Add block ice or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity is expected to be off longer than 4 hours. Wear heavy gloves when handling ice.
    For more information, see Keep Food and Water Safe after a Natural Disaster or Power Outage and Prevent Illness after a Natural Disaster.
    Prevent illness from WATER

    Listen to and follow public announcements. Local authorities will tell you if tap water is safe to drink or to use for cooking or bathing. If the water is not safe to use, follow local instructions to use bottled water or to boil or disinfect water for cooking, cleaning, or bathing.
    Correctly boil or disinfect water. Hold water at a rolling boil for 1 minute to kill bacteria. If you can't boil water, add 1/8 teaspoon (approximately 0.75 mL) of newly purchased, unscented liquid household bleach per gallon of water. Stir the water well, and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. You can use water-purifying tablets instead of boiling water or using bleach. For infants, use only pre-prepared canned baby formula. Do not use powdered formulas prepared with treated water. Disinfect children's toys that have come in contact with water. Use a solution of 1 cup of bleach in 5 gallons of water to disinfect the toys. Let toys air dry after cleaning. Some toys, such as stuffed animals and baby toys, cannot be disinfected; they should be discarded.
    For more information, see Keep Food and Water Safe after a Natural Disaster or Power Outage and Prevent Illness after a Natural Disaster.
    Prevent and treat OTHER ILLNESS and INJURIES

    Prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that is produced by many types of equipment and is poisonous to breathe. Don't use a generator, pressure washer, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline- or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window, door, or vent. Don't run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open. Don't heat your house with a gas oven. If your carbon monoxide detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911. Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseated.
    For more information, see Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After a Disaster.
    Avoid floodwater and mosquitoes. Follow all warnings about water on roadways. Do not drive vehicles or heavy equipment through water. If you have to work in or near floodwater, wear a life jacket. If you are caught in an area where floodwater is rising, wear a life jacket, or use some other type of flotation device. Prevent mosquito bites by wearing long pants, socks, and long-sleeved shirts and by using insect repellents that contain DEET or Picaridin. More information about these and other recommended repellents can be found in the fact sheet Updated Information Regarding Insect Repellents.
    Avoid unstable buildings and structures. Stay away from damaged buildings or structures until they have been examined and certified as safe by a building inspector or other government authority. Leave immediately if you hear shifting or unusual noises that signal that the structure is about to fall.
    Beware of wild or stray animals. Avoid wild or stray animals. Call local authorities to handle animals. Get rid of dead animals according to local guidelines.
    Beware of electrical and fire hazards. NEVER touch a fallen power line. Call the power company to report fallen power lines. Avoid contact with overhead power lines during cleanup and other activities. If electrical circuits and equipment have gotten wet or are in or near water, turn off the power at the main breaker or fuse on the service panel. Do not turn the power back on until electrical equipment has been inspected by a qualified electrician. Do not burn candles near flammable items or leave the candle unattended. If possible, use flashlights or other battery-operated lights instead of candles.
    Beware of hazardous materials. Wear protective clothing and gear (for example, a respirator if needed) when handling hazardous materials. Wash skin that may have come in contact with hazardous chemicals. Contact local authorities if you are not sure about how to handle or get rid of hazardous materials.
    Clean up and prevent mold growth. Clean up and dry out the building quickly (within 24 to 48 hours). Open doors and windows. Use fans to dry out the building. To prevent mold growth, clean wet items and surfaces with detergent and water. To remove mold growth, wear rubber gloves, open windows and doors, and clean with a bleach solution of 1 cup of bleach in 1 gallon of water. Throw away porous items (for example, carpet and upholstered furniture) that cannot be dried quickly. Fix any leaks in roofs, walls, or plumbing.
    For more information, see Mold After a Disaster.
    Pace yourself and get support. Be alert to physical and emotional exhaustion or strain. Set priorities for cleanup tasks, and pace the work. Try not to work alone. Don't get exhausted. Ask your family members, friends, or professionals for support. If needed, seek professional help.
    Prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Use teams of two or more people to move bulky objects. Avoid lifting any material that weighs more than 50 pounds (per person).
    Stay cool. When it's hot, stay in air-conditioned buildings; take breaks in shaded areas or in cool rooms; drink water and nonalcoholic fluids often; wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing; and do outdoor activities during cooler hours.
    Treat wounds. Clean out all open wounds and cuts with soap and clean water. Apply an antibiotic ointment. Contact a doctor to find out whether more treatment is needed (such as a tetanus shot). If a wound gets red, swells, or drains, seek immediate medical attention.
    Wash your hands. Use soap and warm water to wash your hands. If water isn't available, you can use alcohol-based products made for washing hands.
    Wear protective gear for cleanup work. Wear hard hats, goggles, heavy work gloves, and watertight boots with steel toes and insoles (not just steel shank). Wear earplugs or protective headphones to reduce risk from equipment noise.
    For more information, see Prevent Illness after a Natural Disaster and Prevent Injury after a Natural Disaster.
    Content Source:Page last modified January 4, 2008






    You can also get a pdf file like this for each webpage.


    http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurr...f/recovery.pdf


    Cheers,
    Byakga
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    Aswf* wifqufonf/

    rkefwkdif;tjyD;wGif tpmtqdyfoifhjcif;rS umuG,f&ef
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    - a&udk usKdcsuf aomufEkdifygu taumif;qHk; jzpfygonf/ wpfrdepf tenf;qHk; qlyGufatmifusKdyg/
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    vufaq;yg/ qyfjymESifha& aygaygrsm;rsm; r&ygu t&ufjyefudk oHk;Ekdifonf/
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    tcsdefu ta&;MuD;aewmrdkY cyfjrefjrefav; bmomjyefay;vdkufygw,f/ wu,fvdkY usL;ypftzGJ0ifrsm; u,fq,fa&; taeeJY bef;ausmfudk oGm;&if oHk;&wmaygh/ roGm;EkdifcJh&ifvJ tusKd;awmh r,kwfwefbl;vkdY ,lqrdygw,f/

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    - a&S;OD;olem jyKpkenf;
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    -
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    Post Storm Rehabilitation.rtf
    http://www.mediafire.com/?m5x0qyktkjd
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Linn80 View Post
    ta&;BuD;wJh tcsufrsm;jzpfwJhtwGuf wpfa,mufa,mufu bmomjyefay;apcsifygw,f/ jrefrmjynfrSusL;ypfrsm;uvnf; wwfEdkifoavmuf jzefUa0apcsifygw,f/ vlxkusefrm;a&;jzpfwJh twGuf jyoemr&SdvdkU ,lqygw,f/

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    uRefawmfbmomjyef&ifayguf&awGxGufvmrSpdk;vdkUyg/

    armifvif;/
    Last edited by hotrod; 05-08-2008 at 12:38 AM.
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    Default Water Treatment

    ta&;tBuD;qHk;jzpfwJha&yg/ aemufusdaewJha&udk Alum (ausmufcsOf) xnfhvdkuf&if trSKefawG te,fxdkifNyD;MunfoGm;ygw,f/



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    om*d

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThaGeek View Post
    ta&;tBuD;qHk;jzpfwJha&yg/ aemufusdaewJha&udk Alum (ausmufcsOf) xnfhvdkuf&if trSKefawG te,fxdkifNyD;MunfoGm;ygw,f/



    ausmufcsOf rxnfhrDSeJU xnfhNyD;/

    yxr tqifhayghav/ yD;rS MudKcsufaomufaygh/ a&oefUpuf r&EdKifao;wJh ae&mawGtwGuf toHk;0ifrSmyg/

    om*d
    udkom*da& ... enf;enf; xyfjznfhyg&ap/

    ausmufcsOfu ydk;owfwJh tpGrf;r&Sdygbl;/ 'gaMumifh usdKawmh usdK&rSmyJaemf/

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    Last edited by hotrod; 05-08-2008 at 12:42 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
    udkom*da& ... enf;enf; xyfjznfhyg&ap/

    ausmufcsOfu ydk;owfwJh tpGrf;r&Sdygbl;/ 'gaMumifh usdKawmh usdK&rSmyJaemf/

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    [kwfygw,fcifAsm;/ ausmufcsOf yxr tqifhyg/ Coagulation vdkUac:ygw,f/ ydk;aoatmifawmh udsKcsufoHk;&rSmaygh
    2004 Tsunami wkef;uvJoHk;cJhygw,f/ UNICEF report wckrSm zwfvdkuf&vdkUyg
    In Banda Aceh, UNICEF distributed 75 metric tones of aluminium sulphate
    (alum) and 5,000 kilogrammes of calcium hypochlorite (chlorite) which are
    used to purify the raw water to provide safe drinking water to an estimated 80,750 consumers. Since the tsunami, UNICEF has distributed a total of 847 tons of alum and 100,000 kg of chlorine to 16 local water supply boards in NAD, including PDAM Tirta Daroy. The provision of these chemicals has
    been part of UNICEF's relief and recovery effort for the victims of the tsunami.
    om*d
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